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    Keppel yard secures $100 million worth of conversion contracts

    Yard News // March 28, 2003
    Keppel Shipyard, the wholly owned subsidiary of Keppel Corporation Limited, has secured two conversion contracts totaling about S$100 million.

    The first contract is for a fast-track conversion of FPSO Marlim Sul from repeat customer Single Buoy Moorings Inc (SBM).

    The preferred shipyard for SBM in the Far East, Keppel Shipyard has completed four similar fast track projects for SBM since 2000. These projects include FPSO Espadarte, Yetagun FSO, FPSO Falcon, and FPSO Brasil. Work is currently in progress within schedule for FPSO Serpentina, which is due for delivery in April 2003.

    Said Mr Tong Chong Heong, Managing Director and Chief Operating Officer of Keppel Offshore & Marine Ltd (Keppel O&M), the parent company of Keppel Shipyard, "Fast track projects are very challenging both for the owners and the shipyard especially in ensuring that a high standard of work is achieved without compromising safety and cost management."

    "I am glad that since the integration of Keppel Shipyard under Keppel O&M, we have been able to execute such projects even more efficiently. Our safety practices have also improved tremendously in the implementation of yard-wide total safety programme inpartnership with SBM."

    The 270,000dwt FPSO Marlim Sul is scheduled to arrive at Keppel Shipyard in March/April 2003. The work is expected to be completed in 11 months, after which it will be leased for nearly eight years to Petrobras to be deployed in the Marlim Sul field offBrazil.

    The second contract is for the upgrading of a trailing suction hopper dredger, Vasco da Gama, owned by Belgium's Jan de Nul. Work on her involves modification of the ship structure for a deep dredging system that is able to dredge up to 135m deep, installation of suction pipe inlet (130 tons new steel), installation of trunnion gantry/service frame, pump cradle/winch/gantry, 135m/80m suction pipe assembly and inboard dredging pipe/jet pipe and electrical and hydraulic system.

    When completed Vasco da Gama will become the world's largest dredger of its class.

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